School ager with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with neck pain and torticollis for 6 weeks

CT of atlanto-axial rotatory subluxation due to juvenile idiopathic arthritis
Axial images from a CT without contrast of the cervical spine shows the C1 vertebral body rotated to the left approximately 45 degrees (top) in relation to the C2 vertebral body (middle). A MIP image (bottom) better demonstrates the rotation of C1 on C2.

The diagnosis was atlanto-axial rotatory subluxation due to juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Preschooler with fever and torticollis

CT of atlanto-axial rotatory subluxation due to retropharyngeal abscess
Axial images with bone windows from a CT with contrast of the neck shows the C1 vertebral body (above left) rotated approximately 30 degrees to the right in relation to the C2 vertebral body (above right). Axial image with soft tissue windows (below) from the same CT shows a low density fluid collection with an enhancing rim to the left of midline in the retropharyngeal space.

The diagnosis was atlanto-axial rotatory subluxation due to a retropharyngeal abscess.

Newborn with abnormal prenatal echocardiogram after PICC placement

AXR of lower extremity peripherally inserted central catheter / PICC in a left-sided inferior vena cava in a patient with situs inversus
AXR AP shows a left lower extremity PICC and a right femoral venous catheter both of whose tips project over a left-sided inferior vena cava. An umbilical venous catheter tip projects over the ductus venosus. An umbilical arterial catheter tip projects at the level of T9. Nasogastric tube tip projects over the stomach in the right upper quadrant. Feeding tube tip projects transpylorically over the duodenal bulb. The cardiac apex is in the right chest.

The diagnosis was appropriate position of the PICC and low malposition of the umbilical venous catheter in a patient with situs inversus.